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KAMAY11

Tequila Info In Cabo

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Hi girls,

Myself and my FI have decided to do Tequila as our wedding favors...instead of bringing all of it with us on the plane, we thought it would be more convenient (and cheaper) to buy in Mexico. If anyone has done this, and knows of a good place in Cabo-could you let me know? Also, is there anywhere that sells mini bottles??

 

**I did a search on this topic and could not find anything really helpful...so i apologize if there IS something out there that I happened to miss that answers my question!**

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Maybe some girls can provide more specific information to Cabo, but honestly there was so many liquor shops that it was almost too easy for us to find tequila- even the mini bottles. Personally, I would purchase when you get there and not worry about them possibly breaking during your flight. On the way home, it was quite obvious so many people had broken tequila bottles in their bags. We could totally smell it as we were picking up our bags- which was not fun after returning home with a massive hangover!

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There isn't a place in Cabo where you can't buy Tequila! I would suggest Europea. There is one in Cabo San Lucas on the marina, one in the Corridor and one in San Jose del Cabo. Here is a link with their Tequila choices and pricing.

 

Tequila comes in three 'ages': blanco (run away), repasado (yummy) and anejo (oldest and most expensive) and I recommend the repasado's. In particular try any of these brands: Herradura and Don Julio. Stay away from any of the cheap, sugared brands like Cuervo that you might find on the lower shelves of any U.S. store.

Here is a quick and dirty article on Tequila.

 

And lastly the cure for a tequila hangover... time!

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradley Fraser View Post
There isn't a place in Cabo where you can't buy Tequila! I would suggest Europea. There is one in Cabo San Lucas on the marina, one in the Corridor and one in San Jose del Cabo. Here is a link with their Tequila choices and pricing.

Tequila comes in three 'ages': blanco (run away), repasado (yummy) and anejo (oldest and most expensive) and I recommend the repasado's. In particular try any of these brands: Herradura and Don Julio. Stay away from any of the cheap, sugared brands like Cuervo that you might find on the lower shelves of any U.S. store.

Here is a quick and dirty article on Tequila
.

And lastly the cure for a tequila hangover... time!


I realize everyone likes different things but I have to disagree with your "run away" comment pertaining to white (blanco) tequila. Both my fiance and I are tequila drinkers and have been for many years. White tequila is the purest, cleanest form of tequila. It is not aged in oak the way reposado and anejo are. We almost always choose blanco over all others. el corozon and el tesoro are my favorites.

My advice when looking for tequila would be make sure it is made out of 100% blue agave (rather than a mix of blue and green) and is made in jalisco, mexico. green is what they make mezcal out of. Mezcal is an entirely different thing altogether. To make mezcal, rather than roasting the agave hearts like they do for tequila, they char the green agave hearts. Mezcal has a wonderful smokey taste to it. I actually really like it - I do not eat the worms though.

The worm is put into the mezcal as a symbol. The worm represents the symbiotic relationship between itself and the agave plants. Despite the old wives tale, it does not give you hallucinations.

Another tidbit of trivia on tequila -tequila is the only alcohol that is a stimulant.

Here is some information I got off the net that goes more in depth about the types of tequila. I have never considered "reserved" a type and I have learned about another type that is not listed on this literature - joven (mix of blanco and anejo).

TYPES OF TEQUILAS

Tequila can only be produced in Mexico, in the Tequila Region, and must comply with strict Mexican government regulations. In order to satisfy an ever-growing demand and a multitude of consumer's preferences and tastes, tequila is produced in two general categories and four different types in three of those categories. The two categories are defined by the percentage of juices coming from the blue agave:

Tequila 100% Agave. Must be made with 100% blue agave juices and must be bottled at the distillery in Mexico. It may be Blanco, Reposado, or Añejo.

Tequila. Must be made with at least 51% blue agave juices. This tequila may be exported in bulk to be bottled in other countries following the NOM standard. It may be Blanco, Gold, Reposado, or Añejo

The NOM standard defines four types of tequila:

Blanco or Silver
This is the traditional tequila that started it all. Clear and transparent, fresh from the still tequila is called Blanco (white or silver) and must be bottled immediately after the distillation process. It has the true bouquet and flavor of the blue agave. It is usually strong and is traditionally enjoyed in a "caballito" (2 oz small glass).

Oro or Gold
Is tequila Blanco mellowed by the addition of colorants and flavorings, caramel being the most common. It is the tequila of choice for frozen Margaritas.

Reposado or Rested
It is Blanco that has been kept (or rested) in white oak casks or vats called "pipones" for more than two months and up to one year. The oak barrels give Reposado a mellowed taste, pleasing bouquet, and its pale color. Reposado keeps the blue agave taste and is gentler to the palate. These tequilas have experienced exponential demand and high prices.

Añejo or Aged
It is Blanco tequila aged in white oak casks for more than a year. Maximum capacity of the casks should not exceed 600 liters (159 gallons). The amber color and woody flavor are picked up from the oak, and the oxidation that takes place through the porous wood develops the unique bouquet and taste.

Reserva
Although not a category in itself, it is a special Añejo that certain distillers keep in oak casks for up to 8 years. Reserva enters the big leagues of liquor both in taste and in price.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KAMAY11 View Post
Hi girls,
Myself and my FI have decided to do Tequila as our wedding favors...instead of bringing all of it with us on the plane, we thought it would be more convenient (and cheaper) to buy in Mexico. If anyone has done this, and knows of a good place in Cabo-could you let me know? Also, is there anywhere that sells mini bottles??

**I did a search on this topic and could not find anything really helpful...so i apologize if there IS something out there that I happened to miss that answers my question!**
The small Tequila bottles, I agree with other posts and totally recommend buying them at "La Europea". It's a liquor store in the Cabo San Lucas surroundings. This would it be the cheapest option for that.

If you want to add the typical Mexican shot glass, I recommend to buy them at the Flea Market, in the Cabo San Lucas' Marina . You can find those practically everywhere, but there I think you can find the best prices.
I would like to recommend you too, that when shopping in Cabo, is better to exchange your money at the airport, because sometimes the exchange rates in the stores are a total rip off.

Hope you find this information useful!

THE FLEA MARKET: Come with your beach bag empty so you will have extra room for goodies when you go home. Typical handmade Mexican crafts can be found here, few really unique items, but many nicely made textiles, straw hats and silver jewelry. Pick a soft shawl or a bracelet to go with your dinner outfit, or think ahead a bit further and select some pottery to take home. Credit card acceptance varies by vendor. All will accept United States dollars but beware of poor exchange rates. Boulevard Marina in Cabo San Lucas.

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