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Unique Ceremonies


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#21 RiuBride2b

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    Posted 01 July 2007 - 11:05 PM

    I happen to love the hand ceremony along with the candle ceremony. I think I might just do both. Thanks for the idea

    #22 Deighton

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      Posted 02 July 2007 - 12:30 AM

      I love the ideas! How romantic :-)

      #23 rodent

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        Posted 09 July 2007 - 08:28 PM

        I love the hand ceremony. How do you pick your ceremony? Do you meet with the WC when you get there & tell them thats what you want to do? Also, if you write your own vows do you let them know what so they can incorporate that into the ceremony?

        #24 MsShelley

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          Posted 10 July 2007 - 07:58 AM

          here are some more I found:


          Hand Wrapping/Hand Fasting
          Wrapping of the hands is an ancient Celtic tradition. Because the hands
          convey the warmth of the heart and the infinity symbol conveys “forever”...
          the wrapping of your hands also symbolizes the bringing together of
          your two hearts in a marriage of strength and unity.


          Hand Blessing Ceremony
          In the hand ceremony, the bride takes the groom's hands in hers, palms up
          and is invited to view his hands as a gift. Then the same is done by the
          Groom. Can also be done together with a shortened version. Often combined with hand wrapping/hand fasting.


          Wine Ceremony
          In this unity ceremony, the bride pours a white wine while the groom pours a red. This makes a blush wine which can
          be served at your reception as a reminder of the ceremony. This can also be done by pouring one glass of wine and
          sharing it together.


          Cord of Three Strands
          The cord of three strands ceremony is a great addition to a traditional wedding ceremony. It adds a truly unique element
          to your ceremony that friends and family will remember. It can also serve as a substitute for the unity candle. This is
          useful for situations where candles may not be used, or may be difficult.

          At some point in the wedding ceremony, the bride and groom braid the Cord of Three Strands together. The groom
          holds a small metal ring with three attached strands (or simply tie a knot at the end of the cords). The bride then braids
          the strands together, symbolizing the union of God, husband and wife. This ceremony could be adapted to be religious
          or non-religious. It can also symbolize the first task completed together as husband and wife.


          Bouquet of Love and Support
          Do you have a large family or many close friends that you would like to incorporate in your wedding? Here is a great
          way to include them in your ceremony. Friends and family of your choice are given a rose or other flower to bring up
          and set in a vase (on the altar or somewhere in the front). I will explain that this bouquet represents all of the people that
          are present to love and support you in your marriage. These are the people to lean on when you run into bumpy spots in
          your marriage. They will encourage you and help you to stay committed to your spouse and to God.


          Family Ceremony (to include children)
          If there are children to be included in the ceremony there are many ways to do this. The candle
          and sand ceremonies can be used with kids. We can add an extra set of vows to include a vow
          to the child and even a vow from the child to the parents. Children can be presented with a
          medallion or other item. Each family is different and children respond differently depending on
          what ages they are. There are so many choices here!


          Butterfly or Dove Release
          May be done in lieu of tossing rice or rose petals at the couple. Ideally performed
          at the end of the ceremony or at "the kiss". The couple is responsible for purchasing
          either the butterflies or the doves, although I would be more than happy to assist
          with this matter.

          Butterfly Release:
          According to an American Indian Legend, if anyone desires a wish to come true they
          must first capture a butterfly and whisper that wish to it. Since a butterfly can make
          no sound, the butterfly can not reveal the wish to anyone but the "Great Spirit" who
          hears and sees all. In gratitude for giving the beautiful butterfly its freedom, the Great Spirit always grants the wish. So,
          according to legend, by making a wish and giving the butterfly its freedom, the wish will be taken to the heavens and be
          granted. Temperatures should be at least 60 degrees F or the butterflies will not be as active.

          Dove Release:
          The "Ceremonial Dove Release” has been a custom for centuries. The "Noblemen of Olde" released the dove as symbols of
          their eternal love for their brides to be. Doves choose one partner for life and make this commitment until death. The white
          dove has been used throughout history as a symbol of Love, Peace, Purity, Faithfulness and Prosperity. It is said that if
          doves are seen on your wedding day, a happy home is assured. Releasing doves uplifts the eyes, signifies new beginnings,
          and true celebrations in flight.

          #25 rodent

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            Posted 10 July 2007 - 08:53 AM

            Quote:
            Originally Posted by beachbride

            Butterfly Release:
            According to an American Indian Legend, if anyone desires a wish to come true they
            must first capture a butterfly and whisper that wish to it. Since a butterfly can make
            no sound, the butterfly can not reveal the wish to anyone but the "Great Spirit" who
            hears and sees all. In gratitude for giving the beautiful butterfly its freedom, the Great Spirit always grants the wish. So,
            according to legend, by making a wish and giving the butterfly its freedom, the wish will be taken to the heavens and be
            granted. Temperatures should be at least 60 degrees F or the butterflies will not be as active.
            I was just reading about this on the knot last night so I thought I should pass it on.
            "Releasing farm-raised butterflies can be disruptive or even disastrous for local butterfly populations, especially if the just-released are a non-native species or diseased. Even if this isn't a problem, the butterflies you release don't have a great chance of survival. For an alternative, consider a dove release -- these domesticated homing birds will return to their handlers. (For more info about butterfly releases, go to NABA.org.)"

            The Knot - Green Weddings: Green Wedding Myths Busted

            #26 MikkiStreak

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              Posted 30 July 2007 - 08:38 PM

              Some of these might be listed elsewhere, but, oh well...


              Salt Ceremony: Indian weddings often include a salt ceremony, where the bride passes a handful of salt to her groom without spilling any. He then passes it back to her and the exchange is repeated three times. She then performs the salt exchange with all the members of the groom's family, symbolizing her blending in with her new family.

              Breaking Bread Ceremony: The bride and groom tear off pieces of bread, and then each eat a piece. Sometimes the bread is also shared with family and friends. It symbolizes their future as a family together.

              Garland Ceremony or Lei Ceremony: The bride and groom exchange garlands of flowers. This is a common part of Indian weddings, where the ceremony is called varmala or jaimala, and represents a proposal by the bride and acceptance by the groom. It also represents their new unity, blessed by nature. In Hawaian weddings, the bride and groom typically exchange leis. The families may also exchange leis with the couple. Leis represent the love and respect you have for the person you are giving it to, and the unity of the new family.

              Circling: In Eastern European ceremonies, the bride and groom circle the altar three times, which are their first steps together as husband and wife. In Hindu ceremonies, couples circle the fire seven times, sealing their bond. The unbroken circle represents the unbroken committment to each other.

              Broom Jumping: An African-American tradition that has its roots in slavery times when slaves couldn't marry. Typically the family places the broom on the ground, and the bride and groom jump over it together. The broom can then decorate a place of honor in their home.

              Lasso Ceremony: Lasso or rope is placed around the bride and groom's shoulders, usually by the officiant. Sometimes rosary beads, or orange flowers are used instead of rope. It can also be placed around the couple's necks, or wrists.

              Celtic Oathing Stone: The couple holds or puts their hands on a stone during their vows to "set them in stone" (I also believe this is where this phrase comes from, or so the rumor goes)."

              Truce Bell: A bell is rung on the wedding day, the happiest day of the couple's lives and then is placed in a central location in the home. If the couple starts to argue, one of them can ring the truce bell, reminding them both of that happiness and hopefully ending the disagreement quickly.

              #27 foxytv

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                Posted 30 July 2007 - 08:50 PM

                Was talking to my Mom about having our own things added to the ceremony .... and she had never heard of the Hand Ceremony either. I like the fact that it's unique and will be something new for many guests to observe. Plus, I love the meaning of the ceremony .... but will likely switch up some of the wording to personalize it a little more.

                #28 jajajaja

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                  Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:18 PM

                  Quote:
                  Originally Posted by Morgan
                  I was just reading about this on the knot last night so I thought I should pass it on.
                  "Releasing farm-raised butterflies can be disruptive or even disastrous for local butterfly populations, especially if the just-released are a non-native species or diseased. Even if this isn't a problem, the butterflies you release don't have a great chance of survival. For an alternative, consider a dove release -- these domesticated homing birds will return to their handlers. (For more info about butterfly releases, go to NABA.org.)"

                  The Knot - Green Weddings: Green Wedding Myths Busted
                  My FI was just telling me about a wedding in which each guest released a butterfly. He said that they watched the hundreds of butterflies flutter off until a bunch of birds sitting on the church roof swooped down and started picking them off right and left.

                  What a sad (and morbid) way to celebrate a union!
                  Happily married since 2008

                  #29 DreamsTulumBride

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                    Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:41 PM

                    Thanks alot !

                    I was planning of doing the sand ceremony. If I plan to have my kids put some sand, do they do it before or after me?

                    Annie

                    #30 MsShelley

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                      Posted 31 July 2007 - 07:29 AM

                      Quote:
                      Originally Posted by Waiting_for_Sunshine
                      My FI was just telling me about a wedding in which each guest released a butterfly. He said that they watched the hundreds of butterflies flutter off until a bunch of birds sitting on the church roof swooped down and started picking them off right and left.

                      What a sad (and morbid) way to celebrate a union!
                      oh no!! that's awful!




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