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sunshinekc08

Vendor Contracts - Legally binding in another Country

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Quick question. All but one of my vendors so far has given me a contract that we have both signed. The contract is in English & all the vendors are in Mexico.

 

One of my vendors that I was going to book with, when I ask for a contract to look over, they said they don't do contracts, just a deposit.

 

He mentioned that "Unless the contract was in Spanish and notarized it would hold no value here"

 

Does anyone know this to be true?

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I think the real purpose of a contract in this situation is to put the terms in writing so you both know what is expected and what you will get.

 

Regarding the legality - what is the liklihood you will pursue legal action against a vendor in Mexico? Think of how much that would cost - you would have to hire an attorney licensed in Mexico. This is one of the risks of doing business in another country.

 

Personally, I would not send a deposit without the terms clearly laid out - including cost (in USD or the current exchange rate?), services provided, cancellation policy, etc. If they want to call it a "contract" or a "term sheet", I dont think it matters.

 

Can you research the vendor either online or on the forum to make sure they have a good reputation for being honest and fair? That would influence my poll vote.

 

Good Luck!!

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Always have something between both parties signed and dated. And on all my contracts I note when and how much was paid for the deposit.

 

That way if they don't deliver a high resolution disc of images, you won't get stuck if they say "oh that was never included" and you know it was...get what I mean?

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Any contract is better than none at all. Even if you decide it's too bothersome to ever pursue legal action in another country, at least with a contract, you have the option. Courts are somewhat lenient when it comes to what constitutes a "contract" -- so I would definitely write out the terms of the agreement and have it signed. If the vendor refuses to sign anything, find someone else.

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Hi Katie,

 

You've been given some good advice here, and I would like to just reiterate what others have said - it's definitely a good idea to have a contract. If for nothing else, it will at least help you to have some peace of mind to know that you are both on the same page as far as what the vendor has promised in the way of goods and services, the total cost, etc.

 

Hope your big day goes smoothly, and is all you have hoped it would be.

 

Best wishes,

Tod

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