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Originally Posted by NotYourAverageDW View Post
I know this thread has been dead for a few months...but I've been looking at photography sites, and reading different forums and lots of photogs don't give out a high res disc any more, nor do they give out digital negatives, (I'm still not sure if that's the same thing). I even saw on one messageboard where one photog told another that the client can ask all they want, but the only way he'd budge is if they were willing to buy the digital negatives/high res disc at 1,000 an image. Of course I know he was being cheeky it makes me wonder-
how difficult will it be to get the high res disc/digital negatives? And if the photog isn't willing to supply, it it grounds to walk away and try my luck at another?
Just wanted to add and say that this post was meant to be cheeky, its just that I'm honestly wondering how to get the digital negatives/high res disc to be apart of the package if they won't offer it.

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from what i ran across, most photographers did give them out. i would not consider someone who didn't. i do way too many photo projects to not have the digital negatives. I'm having so much fun with mine.

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I can say it all depends on the photographer and the market. Where I'm from most photographers give out the digital negatives, but I know in different areas the norm is to not give them.

 

If photographers won't give them out with the initial price many offer them for an added fee. But of course there are going to be some people that won't budge and won't give them up no matter what.

 

I feel like if its very important for you to have them, then you should be able to find a photographer that will give or sell them to you.

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Most of the photographers I researched do give you the high resolution files (aka digital negatives). If they don't, ask them how much they will charge extra, even if it's 500$ - 1000$ it may be worth it depending on what their prices are for prints and how much you expect to do with your photos.

 

I'd also be clear (i.e. threatning! haha) with the photographer that if they don't offer this option, you will go elsewhere as you insist on having the files/negatives.

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Be aware that "digital negatives" or "digital files" can mean lots of things.

 

"RAW" files are the best equivalent for true negatives... they are the pure data out of the camera and cannot be viewed without a special program such as Photoshop or Lightroom. However, no color correction will have been done on these as there is no way to edit a RAW file without saving into another format.

 

JPG is the most common format for delivering digital files, but be aware that JPG's can be saved at different resolutions and quality levels. Some photographers will purposely downrez their digital files to make the print quality poor at large print sizes (making the client come back to the photog for big enlargements).

 

Also be aware that many photographers do extensive photoshop work to get their trademark "look." Some of these offer the "digital negatives" in their unedited form, and only sell their edited artwork in print/album form. Be clear with your photographer in advance on whether you will be receiving edited or unedited files.

 

I felt the need to hash out all this jargon because I was just reading a post on one of my photography boards where a FOB was asking questions about the disappointing file quality his daughter received in her "digital files, and a misscommunication about what that actually meant was the root cause.

 

 

With regards to the digital negatives being available, that is the general direction of the market. Many of the more traditional photographers, or those who have been influenced by them, will still withhold the diginegs. Many/most of the younger generation offer them. However, be aware that any photographer running an honest-to-goodness business will be sure to price the package or digineg option to compensate for the lack of print sales.

 

If the digital files are important to you, then there are many who would accommodate you.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan Baines View Post
Be aware that "digital negatives" or "digital files" can mean lots of things.

"RAW" files are the best equivalent for true negatives... they are the pure data out of the camera and cannot be viewed without a special program such as Photoshop or Lightroom. However, no color correction will have been done on these as there is no way to edit a RAW file without saving into another format.

JPG is the most common format for delivering digital files, but be aware that JPG's can be saved at different resolutions and quality levels. Some photographers will purposely downrez their digital files to make the print quality poor at large print sizes (making the client come back to the photog for big enlargements).

Also be aware that many photographers do extensive photoshop work to get their trademark "look." Some of these offer the "digital negatives" in their unedited form, and only sell their edited artwork in print/album form. Be clear with your photographer in advance on whether you will be receiving edited or unedited files.

I felt the need to hash out all this jargon because I was just reading a post on one of my photography boards where a FOB was asking questions about the disappointing file quality his daughter received in her "digital files, and a misscommunication about what that actually meant was the root cause.


With regards to the digital negatives being available, that is the general direction of the market. Many of the more traditional photographers, or those who have been influenced by them, will still withhold the diginegs. Many/most of the younger generation offer them. However, be aware that any photographer running an honest-to-goodness business will be sure to price the package or digineg option to compensate for the lack of print sales.

If the digital files are important to you, then there are many who would accommodate you.

Thats a great explanation Evan. You (as a bride) have to be very careful and ask good questions. There are so many names for the files nowadays and photogs can call these things just about anything. For instance I now call the unedited files straight out of the camera "proofs" and then once I retouch them they become "high-res master files".

In the past I always included the "hrmf" in my packages but now I don't. I never really valued the files. As I gained experience, attended workshops and worked really hard I started seeing a value in the final product. So the way I do it now is you just pay for me to shoot your wedding (my creative or shooting fee if you will) and then later, when you see your images online you can decide how best to share and remember your photos. There are some other benefits to working this way, but I'll save them for the brides. wink.gif

anyhow, just make sure you ask good questions, know exactly what you will get and get it in writing!

blessings,

nic

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This is an awesome and informative thread! Great advice! Definitely, book a photographer based on their work, not the packages they offer. Most everyone should be flexible to work with you. There are quite a few photographers who will and some who will not give out the digital negatives no matter what. As far as 2 photographers, we shoot together for many reasons- extra angles, different perspectives, more candids, can bounce ideas off each other, etc. It works great for us!

 

Katie

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