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New Mexican Foreign Worker's Policy??? what?


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#71 MrsV-to-be

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    Posted 03 April 2008 - 10:58 AM

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfwolfe72
    I can't believe that they won't make an exception in your case. Especially since this wasn't part of the contract you signed and especially since they just gave you a month's notice! Can you talk to someone on the phone and then follow-up w/ an email to confirm that they will let you do this? They've got to make an exception - especially since this wasn't their policy all along. It's their own fault that they got slapped w/ fees. Brides shouldn't have to pay for their mistakes. If they get slapped w/ another fee in your case, then THEY should have to pay for it. EDR loves fees - if they had to pay some on their own, it might give them a taste of their own medicine.
    This is what I was thinking as I drove into school today! I did send an email to Valeria last night (freaking out just a bit ), and asking exactly what document they want. I feel that if EDR is going to start enforcing this law - that is fine, but considering that I am a month away from the wedding they should at least help me out get exactly what I need - instead of just generally insisting that I have the "right documentation".
    I have yet to hear from her - so we will see!!

    #72 rodent

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      Posted 03 April 2008 - 11:56 AM

      Quote:
      Originally Posted by scharke
      The FM-3 is a work permit for foreigners who live in Mexico. It is not available unless you live here. This issue is not at all new. It was a big issue for me when I moved here three years ago. It was impressed upon me by my colleagues here that I should NOT shoot weddings here without an FM-3. I risked being discovered by Mexican authorities and I ran the risk of the resort denying entry to me at any time if I did not have the proper paperwork. I risked my entire future here if I had any problems at all, so I took two months off, sat on the beach and applied for and got my FM-3. The FM-3 isn't easy to get, not everyone who applies is granted one. FM-3 status is a very popular topic of discussion among gringos at the bars here.

      One theory that I heard is that when Argentina had their currency crisis (1999-2002), this area experienced a huge influx of Argentinians who began working here without documentation. The government got really serious about documented workers during this time and everything got harder for all foreigners.

      I don't believe this is any kind of conspiracy on EDRs part. We just had elections here and with every change of administration comes new officials. It always seems like they want to come in with a bang and all the rules get tighter after an election. It's a real and ever-present concern here.
      Quote:
      Originally Posted by Helland Photographs
      ... Hey Paul... thank you for your posting... however... I don't live in Mexico (I should have bought a condo years ago, when they were affordable) and I have an FM3. Without it I could not work legally in Mexico; immagration and my attorney made that very clear...
      This is the issue that really confuses me. When I read up on FM3s they really sound like they are only for foreiners living in Mexico. You said it took a lot of time & money to get one. Maybe because they are not truely intended for people who do not live in mexico? It's great you have one, but I really feel like there should be an alternative. There should be an easier way. People have to travel to mexico for business all the time.

      In the US, there is something like an FM3 & something else called a B1. It seems like their should be a Mexico equivilent to a B1. That would be the visa that would suite a US photographer flying in to Mexico for the weekend.

      I do not believe that photographers who do not have the proper permits are trying to break the law or be unfair. It seems like there is a big problem with the lack of the proper permit being available as an option (or it's too difficult to figure out the proper one). If Mexican citizen wants to shoot a wedding in the US, they can get a B1 visa. But, then there appears to be no similar alternative for a US citizen to shoot a wedding in mexico. Otherwise, only people who live in Mexico can photography in Mexico. The only alternative is going through huge legal trouble to bend the visa rules some & get an FM3 which doesn't sound like it is intended for this purpose.

      This issue wouldn't just be for photographers. Anyone who is a citizen somewhere else that needs to travel to mexico for business would need this type of visa.

      maybe we just haven't found the right paper work, but from everything I read an FM3 does not sound like it should be the only option. Maybe it is, but I feel like then a class of business workers is excluded.

      Thank you so much to everyone who is working to help us figure this out. I believe we all agree that immigration laws are important to protect local economies and want to understand the rules so they can be followed. It just troubles me that it is so difficult to get the information.

      #73 MrsV-to-be

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        Posted 03 April 2008 - 12:08 PM

        Hey Morgan, I was just checking out the website that AllureEventDesign posted.
        I would like to visit Mexico - INAMI

        It has an option for my sitatuion - where a business person comes in who is working w/o remuneration. "as a business person for non-remunerated visitors"

        and it has a situation where a person is coming into work. "I intend to engage in Paid Activity" which I believe may cover most other US/Canadian photographers who are coming into work.

        I think the answer may be included in it - there are still alot of questions left unanswered but I think it is a start!
        what do you think?

        #74 Christine

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        Posted 03 April 2008 - 12:17 PM

        As a businessperson, business visitor, consultant, or intercompany transferee, for non-remunerated activities:

        If you are a citizen of:

        Andorra
        Argentina
        Australia
        Austria
        Belgium
        Canada
        Czech Republic
        Chile
        Costa Rica
        Denmark
        Estonia
        Finland
        France
        Germany
        Greece
        Hong Kong
        Hungary
        Ireland
        Iceland
        Israel
        Italy
        Japan
        Latvia
        Lichtenstein
        Lithuania
        Luxemburg
        Monaco
        Norway
        New Zealand
        Poland
        Portugal
        San Marino
        Singapore
        Slovenia
        Slovakia
        South Korea
        Spain
        Sweden
        Switzerland
        The Netherlands
        United Kingdom
        Uruguay
        United States of America
        Venezuela


        You can enter Mexico without a visa showing your passport and the "migration Form for Tourists, Transmigrants, Visiting Businesspersons, or Visiting Consultants", which you can obtain from travel agencies, airlines, or at your point of entry into Mexico.

        You may stay in Mexico for up to 30 days. if you need more time, you must visit any National Institute of Migration office (Instituto Nacional de Migraci³n) to obtain form FM3.

        This option also applies for permanent legal residents in the USA, Canada, or Japan regardless of nationality.

        Under an agreement with Canada and the USA, those countries' citizens may prove their nationality with a passport or other public documents, such as:

        Certified copy of birth certificate.

        Voter registration card.

        Naturalization certificate.

        If any of these documents lack a photograph, travelers must prove their nationality with another official identification:

        Driver's license.

        Identification issued by a state or official agency.

        Although Canadian and US citizens do not need a passport, the National Institute of Migration recommends one to expedite passage through the point of entry.

        To enter Mexico as business, the persons, the citizens of countries different form the list above, must go to the Embassy or Consulate of Mexico to obtain a migratory form FM3.

        * Chinese citizens with passports issued by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

        IMPORTANT: From January 23, 2007, american citizens who travel to Mexico, to return to united States airway they will have to present an in force passport.
        Christine + Will (married 7/20/07) + Ainsleigh (born 6/25/08) + Nolan (born 11/9/10) + Delaney (born 12/31/13) = One Very Happy Family!

        #75 Christine

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        Posted 03 April 2008 - 12:20 PM

        the FM3 does not sound like the documentation that photogs who live in the US need.
        Christine + Will (married 7/20/07) + Ainsleigh (born 6/25/08) + Nolan (born 11/9/10) + Delaney (born 12/31/13) = One Very Happy Family!

        #76 rodent

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          Posted 03 April 2008 - 12:36 PM

          Vari that is so useful! You have been so helpful. I'll read through it all when I get a chance. First I need to buy you a thank you gift.

          #77 PaulSchrank

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            Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:06 PM

            from Business Mobility Group - Travel Handbook

            The following APEC economies do not require a visa: Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and the United States, however, the Migratory Form for Tourist, Transmigrant, Business Visitor or Councilor Visitor (FMTTV), obtainable at ports of entry, travel agencies or from airline personnel should be fulfill. These business travelers are granted an initial stay in Mexico of up to 30 days upon arrival.

            --------

            this is from: Consulado de M©xico en El Paso, Tx.


            Non in-migrant Visa for multiple entries (Business up to 30 days)

            F.M.T.T.V.
            A 30-day multiple entry form for business, investments or transfer of personnel, without receiving any salary in M©xico.

            1) Business -. All those persons who travel to M©xico for business meetings and with the purpose of acquiring new contacts, sales promotions, manufacture and production, marketing, distribution, services to customers or to explore new investment opportunities in Mexico.

            2) Investors-.All those persons who travel to M©xico to establish, develop, administrate or offer key technical services in activities related to executives or those that require essential skills to carry out or administrate an investment in which the person or his company commit or is in the process of committing an important amount of capital.

            3) Transfer of personnel-. Persons employed by a company who are transferred to a subsidiary in M©xico in order to carry out managing and executive activities, or those that require essential specialized knowledge.

            Please note that this information applies only to citizens of the United States and Canada. For citizens of other countries some restrictions may apply, depending on the type of visa they have in the US or the intended activities while in Mexico. For the detailed information regarding your case, please e-mail us at visas@sre.gob.mx

            F.M.T.T.V. is not valid for visits of more than 30 days, but the foreigner can apply for an extension while in Mexico, before the F.M.T.T.V. expires, at the local office of the National Institute of Immigration. Instituto Nacional de Migraci³n

            -F.M.T.T.V. can be obtained at no cost from Mexican Consulates/trade offices, airlines and port of entry.

            -F.M.T.T.V. must be completed at the beginning of each trip.

            -F.M.T.T.V. must be cancelled at the end of each trip to avoid fines on future trips by returning it to the immigration officer at the time you leave Mexico.



            Requirements for F.M.T.T.V.:

            1. Passport or certified birth certificate is needed for proof of citizenship. For other nationalities passport and proof of legal residence in the US is required.



            All applications need to be submitted Monday through Friday between 8:15 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. The process to obtain the F.M.T.T.V. will be the same day.



            For more information, please call:

            Tel. (915)533-3644 / 533-3645 ext. 242


            --------

            Obtain the F.M.T.T.V. before your trip and show it at customs in Mexico.

            i.e. The contract is with an American couple and an American company in the US. The contract is partially fulfilled with a "business meeting" in Mexico that includes "services to customers" and is covered in the F.M.T.T.V. visa. Payment and fulfillment of the contract happens back in the United States.

            #78 rodent

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              Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:09 PM

              Quote:
              Originally Posted by scharke
              from Business Mobility Group - Travel Handbook

              The following APEC economies do not require a visa: Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and the United States, however, the Migratory Form for Tourist, Transmigrant, Business Visitor or Councilor Visitor (FMTTV), obtainable at ports of entry, travel agencies or from airline personnel should be fulfill. These business travelers are granted an initial stay in Mexico of up to 30 days upon arrival.

              --------

              this is from: Consulado de M©xico en El Paso, Tx.


              Non in-migrant Visa for multiple entries (Business up to 30 days)

              F.M.T.T.V.
              A 30-day multiple entry form for business, investments or transfer of personnel, without receiving any salary in M©xico.

              1) Business -. All those persons who travel to M©xico for business meetings and with the purpose of acquiring new contacts, sales promotions, manufacture and production, marketing, distribution, services to customers or to explore new investment opportunities in Mexico.

              2) Investors-.All those persons who travel to M©xico to establish, develop, administrate or offer key technical services in activities related to executives or those that require essential skills to carry out or administrate an investment in which the person or his company commit or is in the process of committing an important amount of capital.

              3) Transfer of personnel-. Persons employed by a company who are transferred to a subsidiary in M©xico in order to carry out managing and executive activities, or those that require essential specialized knowledge.

              Please note that this information applies only to citizens of the United States and Canada. For citizens of other countries some restrictions may apply, depending on the type of visa they have in the US or the intended activities while in Mexico. For the detailed information regarding your case, please e-mail us at visas@sre.gob.mx

              F.M.T.T.V. is not valid for visits of more than 30 days, but the foreigner can apply for an extension while in Mexico, before the F.M.T.T.V. expires, at the local office of the National Institute of Immigration. Instituto Nacional de Migraci³n

              -F.M.T.T.V. can be obtained at no cost from Mexican Consulates/trade offices, airlines and port of entry.

              -F.M.T.T.V. must be completed at the beginning of each trip.

              -F.M.T.T.V. must be cancelled at the end of each trip to avoid fines on future trips by returning it to the immigration officer at the time you leave Mexico.



              Requirements for F.M.T.T.V.:

              1. Passport or certified birth certificate is needed for proof of citizenship. For other nationalities passport and proof of legal residence in the US is required.



              All applications need to be submitted Monday through Friday between 8:15 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. The process to obtain the F.M.T.T.V. will be the same day.



              For more information, please call:

              Tel. (915)533-3644 / 533-3645 ext. 242


              --------

              Obtain the F.M.T.T.V. before your trip and show it at customs in Mexico. It is that simple.
              Yes! I thought there had to be something like this. Thanks so much Paul!

              Thanks everyone who got this conversation going & gave feedback. This will be very helpful for traveling photographers & brides on the forum.

              #79 MelanieS

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                Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:15 PM

                Well, we received the email with the new policy just minutes ago. We were already paying for 3 nights at the resort, so will have to fight them on the additional $500 fee. They cannot possilbly think people will pay $500 more when that was not in the original agreement. Now they've got MOMMA mad!

                #80 MrsV-to-be

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                  Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:18 PM

                  Yes! thank-you Paul!! that is awesome :)




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