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#1 Lauren_Hirshon

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    Posted 03 July 2007 - 01:27 AM

    So I am still trying to figure out how the whole legal ceremony works. I dont get exactly what needs to be done and this whole apostille thing. Does that get done before or after the ceremony? Anyone who has had a legal ceremony, I would appreciate it if you could explain what needs to happen. Thanks!

    #2 michelle08

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      Posted 03 July 2007 - 01:47 AM

      I believe different parts of mexico have different requirements??

      I am getting married in Cabo and I have to be there at least 2 days before the wedding to get bloodwork and paperwork done. Then My WC is going to get the marriage license apostilled which I guess is like a raised seal on it to make it legal. She is also going to make sure it's translated into english for me so I can bring it back home and I guess change my name...

      Still not an expert on this...

      #3 rodent

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        Posted 03 July 2007 - 12:03 PM

        I was trying to figure out all the details & decided to just make it legal at the courthouse before we go & have a ceremony in mexico. My hotel would require that we get there 5 days in advance for a civil ceremony! There is a lot of work to be done to have a legal ceremony, but there are a lot of great people on this forum who can help you with it.

        #4 gracefulsteph

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          Posted 04 July 2007 - 11:12 AM

          I just started looking into this as well. I believe "apostilled" means that your documents need the raised seal of the state you were born in. Cancun also requires that our birth certificates be translated into spanish beforehand by a authorized translator.....still have no clue on how to go about that. Anybody have any ideas?


          Thanks for this post..........I need the help too!

          #5 TammyB

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            Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:00 PM

            Quote:
            Originally Posted by michelle08
            I believe different parts of mexico have different requirements??

            I am getting married in Cabo and I have to be there at least 2 days before the wedding to get bloodwork and paperwork done. Then My WC is going to get the marriage license apostilled which I guess is like a raised seal on it to make it legal. She is also going to make sure it's translated into english for me so I can bring it back home and I guess change my name...

            Still not an expert on this...

            That's exactly what an apposile is, "a raised seal" that proves its a legal document. Some states require it in order to change your name. Also based on my HORRIBLE experience with changing my name, if you are going to get your documents translated be sure that it has the company name of who did the translation, address, it's an orginal document and the person who did the translation signed it. I ended up having to pay a translation company ontop of what our wedding coordinator sent us because they refused to accept it.

            #6 MsShelley

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              Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:04 PM

              I was wondering about this as well, especially seeing everyone else was having one!

              #7 Yazmin De La Mora

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                Posted 04 July 2007 - 03:15 PM

                Hello everyone!!
                You should not be worried about a thing beacuase your WC supposed to do everything for you!!

                My mother is a Civil officiate in Acapulco and the requirements are the same but she is much flexible than here in the Riviera Maya or Cabo but I think, this is beacause there are no so many weddings lthere like here or in Cabo.

                Here is some information that could help you to undestand better:


                The Civil Ceremony is the only marriage in Mexico which modifies the marital status of a person from single to married, whether under the regimen of division of property or joint ownership of property and it is the only one that is internationally accepted, therefore your Marriage Certificate is legally binding in Mexico.

                A Mexican Civil Marriage generates an original Legal Marriage Certificate and a Certified Copy. The Original eventually goes to Chetumal, capital of the State of Quintana Roo, where it is permanently filed: The Certified Copy –duly stamped and signed in ink by the Judge—goes to the couple.

                Your WC should send to you in about 2 months after the wedding date, the "original" wedding certificate with the mexican apostille or seal that is normally done in the back of the certificate.

                The Marriage Certificate is recognized by 65 States that are Members of the Hague Conference on Private International Law like the United States, Canada, France, England, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, Ireland, Belgium, Italy, Denmark, Netherlands, Sweden, Japan and most other countries.

                One of the requirements is that the couple and their four witnesses be present three working days before the date of the wedding for delivering and signing all of the documents required by the Civil Registry.

                The Matrimonio Civil is performed by the Registro Civil via their Judges. The wedding is in Spanish and during the Ceremony; a text from Melchor Ocampo, a nineteenth century Mexican poet, is recited, declaring the couple as husband and wife.

                Sometimes the Civil officiate does not speak english so your WC should provide an English translator who simultaneously interprets the ceremony.

                All foreign documents (birth certificate, divorce decree, death certificate, etc.) which are to be submitted to Mexican Officials for any legal procedure within the country, must have the legal Spanish translation (to be done in Mexico by the Civil Officiant or Registro Civil) and must be certified by-an APOSTILLE.

                An apostille is an internationally recognized notary certification, done in the country of origin of the documents, and usually issued by the State Department of each country.

                In the United States, contact the Secretary of State in the state where you live.

                In Canada contact your nearest Mexican Embassy Office and ask for the Authentication Document which serves the same purpose as the Apostille document. We suggest that you bring at least one complete set of copies, plus the originals.

                A Civil Marriage in Mexico constitutes a Legal act that generates public documents of record; if you fail to comply with the requisites the Marriage cannot take place and that is why the Civil officiate request you all to be on site at least 3 full working days prior the wedding day in case some documentation is missing or something is wrong, to have enough time to arrange the problem.

                It gets just a little bit complicate (because the apostille) when Bride is divorced but if Bride is single that is very, very easy.

                I hope it helped a little bit!

                Good Luck!

                Yazmin.






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