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Dreams Tulum Civil Ceremony/Legal Help


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#1 Sannjn

Sannjn
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    Posted 14 September 2007 - 05:36 PM

    Thank you for reading...

    I need some help and I'm getting frustrated because I'm finding multiple answers.

    We are getting married at Dreams Tulum in June 2008. We really want to get legally married in Mexico but after reading the 'List of legal requirments' from Dreams Tulum I thought it might be easier to sign the paperwork here in the US first...it said it would take 1-4 month to have our documents sent through the 'Validation Process' since our marriage licenses is only legal in Mexico (and not internationally).

    But then I talked to a friend who got married in Mexico last year and when they signed their certificates that was it and they were legal in the US also (no waiting or further processing). I just called my local courthouse and they said that if I get married in Mexico, I'm legal worldwide. I said 'so once we sign our certificate during our ceremony, what do we do with it' and he said 'keep it' but he did inform me I would have to get it translated from Spanish to English for when I change my name (and all my legal documentation).

    I'm CONFUSED! Please help! Has anyone gotten married legally (civil ceremony) at Dreams Tulum. Thank you so much for your help!

    #2 Karen

    Karen
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      Posted 14 September 2007 - 05:54 PM

      We got legally married at Dreams Tulum in July and came home with 4 copies of the Mexican marriage certificate in Spanish and a wedding transcript in English. We didn't opt to do the 3 month wait for the Apostille and it turns out that we really didn't need it. The marriage is legally recognized here in the US and I've had little to no problems with the name change. The driver's license is a little bit of a hassle because only an American marriage cert is accepted as proof of identity so I had to wait for other forms of ID (SS card, credit cards, etc.) to bring as proof of identity. I'm about to get my name changed on my passport and there might be a little hassle there. But overall it wasn't as much of a pain as I though it was.
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      #3 Sannjn

      Sannjn
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        Posted 14 September 2007 - 06:56 PM

        Thank you for your response it is very, very helpful and calming my nerves.

        What is the 'wedding transcript in English'?

        So...you requested copies of the spanish marriage certificate and you didn't need to get it translated into english to do your name changing? If you did get it translated...where did you go for that (in US)? Is there an option at the resort to have it translated into English before leaving (without waiting 3 months)?

        I don't know why they tell you that it isn't legal anywhere else but Mexico if you don't do the Apostille.

        #4 Karen

        Karen
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          Posted 15 September 2007 - 08:40 PM

          [QUOTE=Sannjn;155561]Thank you for your response it is very, very helpful and calming my nerves.
          Your'e Welcome! This is confusing stuff.

          What is the 'wedding transcript in English'?
          It was basically this document that had the wedding ceremony vows written out

          So...you requested copies of the spanish marriage certificate and you didn't need to get it translated into english to do your name changing?
          No

          If you did get it translated...where did you go for that (in US)?
          Not Sure

          Is there an option at the resort to have it translated into English before leaving (without waiting 3 months)?
          Not sure. Basiclly what Sandra said took three months was her sending away for and getting an Apostille seal from the U.S. and then sending it to us. We decided that we could do that ourselves if needed
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          #5 lambert13

          lambert13
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            Posted 17 September 2007 - 09:08 AM

            Once you get married in Mexico you are legally married (as long as it is a legal ceremony). What Sandra was probably trying to say is that the marriage certificate may not be considered a legal document outside of Mexico for things like name changes and whatnot without a translation and certification (apostille).

            The legal ceremony is not as big of a hassle as it seems to be.

            #6 Sannjn

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              Posted 17 September 2007 - 01:12 PM

              Thank you both so much for your input...it is exactly what I needed.

              It is official...we are getting married in Mexico (legally)!!! I'm so excited! I really didn't like the idea of being married (signing papers in the states) before the ceremony.

              Thanks again.




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