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Something old, something new something borrowed, something blue ...


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#1 Nan

Nan
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    Posted 17 September 2010 - 01:07 AM

     I´ve been doing some "research" and this is what I found...

     

    Something old, something new

    Something borrowed, something blue

    And a silver sixpence in her shoe.

     

    So this wedding tradition is definitely English, and many sources say that it began in the Victorian era.

    Each item in this poem represents a good-luck token for the bride. If she carries all of them on her wedding day, her marriage will be happy. "Something old" symbolizes continuity with the bride's family and the past. "Something new" means optimism and hope for the bride's new life ahead. "Something borrowed" is usually an item from a happily married friend or family member, whose good fortune in marriage is supposed to carry over to the new bride. The borrowed item also reminds the bride that she can depend on her friends and family.

    As for the colorful item, blue has been connected to weddings for centuries. In ancient Rome, brides wore blue to symbolize love, modesty, and fidelity. And finally, a silver sixpence in the bride's shoe represents wealth and financial security.


    Nan and Erik forever!!!

    #2 niajs

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      Posted 17 September 2010 - 03:37 AM

      This is definitely a British tradition but brides more often than not forget the silver sixpence. I post on another forum in the UK and there's a sixpence making its way around all of the brides. I think it's really sweet!



      #3 Nan

      Nan
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        Posted 17 September 2010 - 04:14 AM

         So I´ve heard...it´s nice to have a sixpence making its way around all of the brides!! I´ve read a dime or a penny would do. Or that there are companies making this " fake-sixpence" to be used by BTBs 

        I do want to wear all of the things suggested in the poem though.


        Nan and Erik forever!!!

        #4 niajs

        niajs
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          Posted 20 September 2010 - 02:37 AM

          It's a fake sixpence in the UK too. The tradition obviously started many years ago when the sixpence was real currency in circulation. We haven't had sixpences since (I think) the 70s. Makes it a lot harder to find, but there's loads on wedding websites.






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